File Extension


Below you will find a collection of popular file extensions, how to open them on Windows and Mac, and various file formats available on your computer. Before we jump into the “advanced” mode, let’s get back to some basics.

Different File Formats Explained

Here is an exhaustive collections of files. Feel free to browse through them, and if you have any questions, require help, send an email with your question.

XPS File Format

Microsoft’s very own file extension, XPS is an XML Paper Specification format used mainly for printing purposes.

XPS File Format

Microsoft’s very own file extension, XPS is an XML Paper Specification format used mainly for printing purposes.

What is a File Extension?

Every file residing on your computer — with a file extension to it — can be opened using one or several applications. The files must have an extension, otherwise the application will not be able to recognize the file.

For example, consider a file that has no extension — there’s no suffix at the end of the filename. This can only mean three things:

  • Your computer doesn’t have the required program to open the file.
  • The file doesn’t have an file extension.
  • The file is damaged.

Similar terms: Filename extensions, file format, filename format.

How File Extensions are Recognized?

Your computer, or more specifically your Operating System, is really smart to identify various file extension. Your OS will do the “matching” job. Microsoft has an useful article on how their Operating System recognizes various file extensions and opens them various already-installed programs:

When you double-click a file to open it, Windows XP (Windows Vista, Windows 7) examines the file name extension. If the Windows OS recognizes the file name extension, it opens the file in the program that is associated with that file name extension.